Friday, March 27, 2015

Carl Fred Musbach

Carl Fred Musbach

The Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial in France is the final resting place for over 2,000 American soldiers who lost their lives during World War I. Most of the headstones mark the graves of men who fought in the Marne Valley during the last German offensive of 1918. Among these simple white cross headstones is an unmarked grave representing Carl Fred Musbach. Musbach served with the 66th company, 5th Marine Regiment, 2nd Division. He was killed on July 18, 1918 during the battle of Belleau Wood and declared missing in action. He is one of the 1,060 missing soldiers memorialized within the chapel at the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery.

Friday, March 20, 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories: Forty and Eight

 
Samuel Frank's Forty and Eight shirt. Missouri History Museum.
 
 
 
 
At the end of World War I in November 1918, U.S. military men and women began their return home. The shared experiences and bonds formed in military service gave rise to veterans’ organizations on a local and national scale. The Forty and Eight, was founded in 1920 by returning World War I veterans as an honor society for members of the American Legion. Click here to read a blog about the Forty and Eight written by Patrick Allie, WWI Exhibit Curator, Missouri History Museum.

Friday, March 13, 2015

The Josef Bergmann Collection

Graduation photo of six students on a bench c.a. 1900
Bergmann is 4th from the left

Last year, project staff digitized the Josef Bergmann collection at the Holocaust Museum and Learning Center Archives in St. Louis, Missouri. Bergmann was born in Przeworsk, Poland, on December 13, 1879. He graduated from the University of Berlin in 1905 and became a physician. Bergmann became a German Citizen in 1913. On March 11, 1916, during WWI, he was decorated with the Merit of the Golden Crown Medal by the Emperor of Austria for bravery. Bergmann was discharged from the Austrian Army in 1918.  In 1935,  he was issued the Cross of Honor, which was given to all WWI  combatants. On June 5, 1939, at the height of Nazism, Bergmann's physicians license was revoked by the German government. On April 11, 1939 he was issued an immigration visa from the American Vice Consul in Berlin and on June 25, 1939 he was issued a visa through Belgium. On October 3, 1945, Bergmann  became a naturalized citizen of the United States in St. Louis, Missouri where he and his family settled.

Friday, March 6, 2015

Donna Caldwell WWI Photograph Collection

German airplane shot down by Salmson 2A2
This World War I collection contains photos that are part of a larger collection compiled by Richard A. Harris and Thomas Berenato during their respective overseas service and preserved by their descendants, the Caldwell family of Marion County, Missouri. The photos contain a unique array of images, including aerial combat, German planes, artillery pieces, shell destruction, the St. Mihiel Offensive, various battlefields, German troops and General Pershing. Below is a sampling of images from the collection, which is set to be digitized by Over There in it's entirety. Enjoy!


Friday, February 27, 2015

Joseph J. Koch Collection


Joseph J. Koch
The Joseph J. Koch Collection is one of the most unique reviewed by Missouri Over There Staff. Through a variety of photographs and documents, it tells the story of Koch’s service with the Missouri National Guard in the Punitive Expedition and World War I.

Friday, February 20, 2015

Olga Krieger: Red Cross Nurse for Base Hospital 21

 

A group of nurses form Base Hospital 21 on the deck of the S.S. St. Paul.
The Olga A. Krieger papers from the Washington University School of Medicine were recently transcribed, revealing the life of a Red Cross nurse working in France during World War I. Krieger’s memoir provides details of the horrific sights of war, and the tremendous responsibilities of Red Cross nurses. 


Friday, February 13, 2015

WWI Artifacts and Memories: H. H. Luedinghaus and the USS Vencedor

The USS Vencedor in service during WWI.
Courtesy of the Naval History and Heritage Command.
Photo #: NH 102346n
Recently,  Patrick Allie, WWI Exhibit Curator at the Missouri History Museum, wrote a blog about H.H. Luedinghaus and the U.S.S. Vencedor.  In it, he tells the story of how Luedinghaus and nine other young businessmen purchased a yacht and offered their services to the U. S. Navy during the war.  To read the blog, click here.